078 TSP It Pains Me to Say This

Musicians often experience pain in discomfort when playing or studying their instrument. Students often share these same painful experiences.

How can parents and teachers help young students avoid painful issues? This episode discusses this question and relates many personal stories of pain and discomfort in an effort to bring awareness of the large scope of the pain issue in the music world, for professionals and students alike.

I mentioned a few resources in the episode, and I find the information in both of the following publications to be quite useful. These are affiliate links, which means that if you use these links to order any of these resources, the podcast will receive a small benefit at no additional cost to you. You are never under any obligation to purchase anything, but if you do, please consider using the links that I have provided (click on the image).

How Muscles Learn: Teaching the Violin with the Body in Mind by Susan Kempter

What Every Musician Needs to Know About the Body by Benjamin and Barbara Conable

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If you are a parent of a beginning violin student and looking for help in between lessons, consider my book The Twinkle Project as a resource of teaching points, learning steps, and games and activities to assist the parent in practicing at home. I include a great deal of information, tools, worksheets, and checklists to assist parents. A parent who struggles to remember what to do in between weekly lessons will find all the answers in this book.

Many teachers will also find this book a helpful resource because it gathers in one place all the information to be used to teach a beginning violin student from the initial start up steps to the point of performing all the Twinkle, Twinkle Little Star variations. I have included all the tiny steps that I use when I begin a young violin student.

wonderful resource and guide that has all the nuts and bolts organized so nicely for the twinkle stages of study … looking forward to sharing with parents as a useful tool towards goal setting, pacing and achievement! — MD Suzuki teacher

For more information about The Twinkle Project, including the two short movies that explain why I wrote the book and give a good overview of what the book is about and what it contains, visit here. You can purchase the book here.

If you have questions or answers or you would like to comment or leave me a voice mail, you can do so at (512) 537-6356. If you would like to send me an email, you may do so at paula@teachsuzuki.com. I welcome comments and questions about this episode and am interested in hearing about the perspective of other parents and teachers.

You may find more information and useful articles on my blog at: Teach Suzuki Blog.

Until next time,

Happy Practicing!

—– Paula —–

© 2017 by Paula E. Bird

Join the Teach Suzuki Community!

If you would like to make a donation to support the Teach Suzuki Podcast and the blog, click here to donate.

Reflections — The Sprout of Possibility

“Any child has the sprout of possibility to grow,” Dr. Suzuki said. What does this mean for a parent? Is it important that a parent believe that talent is something that can be developed? This reflection answers these question and encourages parents to avoid the easy route of waiting for talent to reveal itself with no effort on the parent’s part.

This episode is part of the “Reflections” series of podcast episodes, which are short, minutes long reflections about a quote or other thought from Dr. Shinichi Suzuki’s philosophy or writing. The purpose of these reflections is to give parents and teachers a chance to spend a few minutes thinking about how great the impact might be on the world and our children with merely a slight moment of reflection about a behavior, thought, or attitude.

If you have a comment or suggestion, you can leave me a voice message on my voicemail line at 512-537-6356 or send me an email at paula@teachsuzuki.com.

For more information and articles, visit my blog at:

http://teachsuzuki.blogspot.com.

Until next time,

Happy Practicing!

—– Paula —–

© 2017 by Paula E. Bird

If you would like to make a donation to support the Teach Suzuki Podcast and the blog, click here to donate.

077 TSP Rhythm (& a 1 & a 2 . . .)

Rhythm is all around us and can be the bridge or connection between people. How can we incorporate it in our lessons, group classes, and practices?

I mentioned a few resources in the podcast episode. If you are interested in any of these resources, please consider using the links I have provided here. You are not under any obligation to buy anything, but if you decide to purchase any of these resources and use the links provided, the podcast receives a small benefit at no cost to you.

Here are some of the music teaching resources that I use in my own studio:

I Can Read Music by Joanne Martin

I Know a Fox With Dirty Socks by William Starr

The Rhythm Train by Dana Bowen


Music Mind Games by Michiko Yurko

Here are some of my favorite books for jingle possibilities:

Dr. Seuss (my favorite book as a child!) — “Do you like my hat?”)


The Gingerbread Man — a timeless classic!

Here are some cool videos for rhythmic activities and other resources:

Step Dance for Beginners video

Shane Bang teaches pen tapping

Rhythm Cup Explorations

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If you are a parent of a beginning violin student and looking for help in between lessons, consider my book The Twinkle Project as a resource of teaching points, learning steps, and games and activities to assist the parent in practicing at home. I include a great deal of information, tools, worksheets, and checklists to assist parents. A parent who struggles to remember what to do in between weekly lessons will find all the answers in this book.

Many teachers will also find this book a helpful resource because it gathers in one place all the information to be used to teach a beginning violin student from the initial start up steps to the point of performing all the Twinkle, Twinkle Little Star variations. I have included all the tiny steps that I use when I begin a young violin student.

wonderful resource and guide that has all the nuts and bolts organized so nicely for the twinkle stages of study … looking forward to sharing with parents as a useful tool towards goal setting, pacing and achievement! — MD Suzuki teacher

For more information about The Twinkle Project, including the two short movies that explain why I wrote the book and give a good overview of what the book is about and what it contains, visit here. You can purchase the book here.

If you have questions or answers or you would like to comment or leave me a voice mail, you can do so at (512) 537-6356. If you would like to send me an email, you may do so at paula@teachsuzuki.com. I welcome comments and questions about this episode and am interested in hearing about the perspective of other parents and teachers.

You may find more information and useful articles on my blog at: Teach Suzuki Blog.

Until next time,

Happy Practicing!

—– Paula —–

© 2017 by Paula E. Bird

Join the Teach Suzuki Community!

If you would like to make a donation to support the Teach Suzuki Podcast and the blog, click here to donate.

Reflections — The Potential Ability of a Child

When we look at a child, we can only see the child’s potential. We cannot see the child’s talent. That has not yet been created or developed. This episode examines Dr. Suzuki’s quote that “[O]ne cannot look at a small child and randomly choose what he does well and what he does poorly.”

This episode is part of the “Reflections” series of podcast episodes, which are short, minutes long reflections about a quote or other thought from Dr. Shinichi Suzuki’s philosophy or writing. The purpose of these reflections is to give parents and teachers a chance to spend a few minutes thinking about how great the impact might be on the world and our children with merely a slight moment of reflection about a behavior, thought, or attitude.

If you have a comment or suggestion, you can leave me a voice message on my voicemail line at 512-537-6356 or send me an email at paula@teachsuzuki.com.

For more information and articles, visit my blog at:

http://teachsuzuki.blogspot.com.

Until next time,

Happy Practicing!

—– Paula —–

© 2017 by Paula E. Bird

If you would like to make a donation to support the Teach Suzuki Podcast and the blog, click here to donate.

076 TSP Siblings in the Studio

This podcast episode looks at the issue of siblings in the studio and whether siblings should be invited into the studio and group class situation. Siblings provide teachers, parents, and students with learning opportunities that can enrich a lesson or group class as well as benefit the sibling’s development.

I mentioned a few resources in the podcast episode. If you are interested in any of these resources, please consider using the links I have provided here. You are not under any obligation to buy anything, but if you decide to purchase any of these resources and use the links provided, the podcast receives a small benefit at no cost to you.

I think every teacher and parent should have Dr. Suzuki’s two books in his or her library. These are timeless books in terms of philosophy that lasts and never goes out of style. We will always care about children and how they develop their talent and ability.

 (and here is the Kindle version)

(and here is the Kindle version)

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If you are a parent of a beginning violin student and looking for help in between lessons, consider my book The Twinkle Project as a resource of teaching points, learning steps, and games and activities to assist the parent in practicing at home. I include a great deal of information, tools, worksheets, and checklists to assist parents. A parent who struggles to remember what to do in between weekly lessons will find all the answers in this book.

Many teachers will also find this book a helpful resource because it gathers in one place all the information to be used to teach a beginning violin student from the initial start up steps to the point of performing all the Twinkle, Twinkle Little Star variations. I have included all the tiny steps that I use when I begin a young violin student.

wonderful resource and guide that has all the nuts and bolts organized so nicely for the twinkle stages of study … looking forward to sharing with parents as a useful tool towards goal setting, pacing and achievement! — MD Suzuki teacher

For more information about The Twinkle Project, including the two short movies that explain why I wrote the book and give a good overview of what the book is about and what it contains, visit here. You can purchase the book here.

If you have questions or answers or you would like to comment or leave me a voice mail, you can do so at (512) 537-6356. If you would like to send me an email, you may do so at paula@teachsuzuki.com. I welcome comments and questions about this episode and am interested in hearing about the perspective of other parents and teachers.

You may find more information and useful articles on my blog at: Teach Suzuki Blog.

Until next time,

Happy Practicing!

—– Paula —–

© 2017 by Paula E. Bird

Join the Teach Suzuki Community!

If you would like to make a donation to support the Teach Suzuki Podcast and the blog, click here to donate.

Reflections — Different Environments, Different Children

This reflection explores Dr. Suzuki’s claim that it is impossible to recreate an environment that is exactly the same for two people.

This episode is part of the “Reflections” series of podcast episodes, which are short, minutes long reflections about a quote or other thought from Dr. Shinichi Suzuki’s philosophy or writing. The purpose of these reflections is to give parents and teachers a chance to spend a few minutes thinking about how great the impact might be on the world and our children with merely a slight moment of reflection about a behavior, thought, or attitude.

If you have a comment or suggestion, you can leave me a voice message on my voicemail line at 512-537-6356 or send me an email at paula@teachsuzuki.com.

For more information and articles, visit my blog at:

http://teachsuzuki.blogspot.com.

Until next time,

Happy Practicing!

—– Paula —–

© 2017 by Paula E. Bird

If you would like to make a donation to support the Teach Suzuki Podcast and the blog, click here to donate.

075 TSP Reduce Friction and Take Up Juggling | Parents Who Practice

This podcast episode looks at two ideas that may be useful to ease the friction associated with practicing: activation energy and juggling. For many people, finding a way to adjust or minimize the amount of energy it takes to activate or initiate the practice session will help immensely to ease the pain of getting the practice going. Juggling provides us with easy to understand metaphors and observations of how a practice session for learning music might be structured.

I mentioned a few resources in the podcast episode. If you are interested in any of these resources, please consider using the links I have provided here. You are not under any obligation to buy anything, but if you decide to purchase any of these resources and use the links provided, the podcast receives a small benefit at no cost to you.

I started my juggling experience with this set of materials. Everything I needed. Click on the picture for more information.

I have used these balls recently and enjoy them. Click on the picture for more information.

Here is a link to a terrific juggling instructor:

Juggling Video (3 balls): Niels Duinker breaks down the juggling experience into small steps that make it easy to understand, practice, and progress.

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If you are a parent of a beginning violin student and looking for help in between lessons, consider my book The Twinkle Project as a resource of teaching points, learning steps, and games and activities to assist the parent in practicing at home. I include a great deal of information, tools, worksheets, and checklists to assist parents. A parent who struggles to remember what to do in between weekly lessons will find all the answers in this book.

Many teachers will also find this book a helpful resource because it gathers in one place all the information to be used to teach a beginning violin student from the initial start up steps to the point of performing all the Twinkle, Twinkle Little Star variations. I have included all the tiny steps that I use when I begin a young violin student.

wonderful resource and guide that has all the nuts and bolts organized so nicely for the twinkle stages of study … looking forward to sharing with parents as a useful tool towards goal setting, pacing and achievement! — MD Suzuki teacher

For more information about The Twinkle Project, including the two short movies that explain why I wrote the book and give a good overview of what the book is about and what it contains, visit here. You can purchase the book here.

If you have questions or answers or you would like to comment or leave me a voice mail, you can do so at (512) 537-6356. If you would like to send me an email, you may do so at paula@teachsuzuki.com. I welcome comments and questions about this episode and am interested in hearing about the perspective of other parents and teachers.

You may find more information and useful articles on my blog at: Teach Suzuki Blog.

Until next time,

Happy Practicing!

—– Paula —–

© 2017 by Paula E. Bird

Join the Teach Suzuki Community!

If you would like to make a donation to support the Teach Suzuki Podcast and the blog, click here to donate.

Reflections — Watch Those Corrections!

This reflection asks parents whether they are creating a good environment in which the child will become talented. Parents may create an unpleasant learning environment with too much criticizing, complaining, and correcting.

This episode is part of the “Reflections” series of podcast episodes, which are short, minutes long reflections about a quote or other thought from Dr. Shinichi Suzuki’s philosophy or writing. The purpose of these reflections is to give parents and teachers a chance to spend a few minutes thinking about how great the impact might be on the world and our children with merely a slight moment of reflection about a behavior, thought, or attitude.

If you have a comment or suggestion, you can leave me a voice message on my voicemail line at 512-537-6356 or send me an email at paula@teachsuzuki.com.

For more information and articles, visit my blog at:

http://teachsuzuki.blogspot.com.

Until next time,

Happy Practicing!

—– Paula —–

© 2017 by Paula E. Bird

If you would like to make a donation to support the Teach Suzuki Podcast and the blog, click here to donate.

074 TSP Habit 7: Sharpen the Saw | Renew & Refresh

Stephen Covey’s Habit 7, Sharpen the Saw, may be one of the most important habits that Suzuki teachers and parents cultivate. Habit 7 fills our reserves for creativity and energy and helps us be our most effective selves as teachers and parents.

I mentioned a few resources in the podcast episode. If you are interested in any of these resources, please consider using the links I have provided here. You are not under any obligation to buy anything, but if you decide to purchase any of these resources and use the links provided, the podcast receives a small benefit at no cost to you.

The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People by Stephen R. Covey (here is the Kindle version)

The Artist’s Way by Julia Cameron (here is the Kindle version)

Here are the other podcast episodes in the habit series:

7 Habits of Highly Effective Suzuki Teachers & Parents – introductory episode

Habit 1: Be Proactive | Take Charge

Habit 2: Begin With the End in Mind | Scrooge & the Future Ghost

Habit 3: Put First Things First | Manage Yourself

Habit 4: Seek First to Understand, Then Be Understood

Habit 5: Think “Win/Win”

Habit 6: Synergize

Here are my blog articles about the GTD (Getting Things Done) Method by David Allen:

GTD for the Music Studio Teacher

GTD Step 1: Gather and Capture

GTD Part 2 Clarify

GTD Step 3 Organize

GTD Step 4 Review & Reflect

GTD Tools & Resources

 

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If you are a parent of a beginning violin student and looking for help in between lessons, consider my book The Twinkle Project as a resource of teaching points, learning steps, and games and activities to assist the parent in practicing at home. I include a great deal of information, tools, worksheets, and checklists to assist parents. A parent who struggles to remember what to do in between weekly lessons will find all the answers in this book.

Many teachers will also find this book a helpful resource because it gathers in one place all the information to be used to teach a beginning violin student from the initial start up steps to the point of performing all the Twinkle, Twinkle Little Star variations. I have included all the tiny steps that I use when I begin a young violin student.

wonderful resource and guide that has all the nuts and bolts organized so nicely for the twinkle stages of study … looking forward to sharing with parents as a useful tool towards goal setting, pacing and achievement! — MD Suzuki teacher

For more information about The Twinkle Project, including the two short movies that explain why I wrote the book and give a good overview of what the book is about and what it contains, visit here. You can purchase the book here.

If you have questions or answers or you would like to comment or leave me a voice mail, you can do so at (512) 537-6356. If you would like to send me an email, you may do so at paula@teachsuzuki.com. I welcome comments and questions about this episode and am interested in hearing about the perspective of other parents and teachers.

You may find more information and useful articles on my blog at: Teach Suzuki Blog.

Until next time,

Happy Practicing!

—– Paula —–

© 2017 by Paula E. Bird

Join the Teach Suzuki Community!

If you would like to make a donation to support the Teach Suzuki Podcast and the blog, click here to donate.

Reflections — Self-Reflection Questions About Practice for Parents

This reflection offers several questions that parents can ask themselves to encourage self-reflection about the causes for success or disappointment in home practices.

This episode is part of the “Reflections” series of podcast episodes, which are short, minutes long reflections about a quote or other thought from Dr. Shinichi Suzuki’s philosophy or writing. The purpose of these reflections is to give parents and teachers a chance to spend a few minutes thinking about how great the impact might be on the world and our children with merely a slight moment of reflection about a behavior, thought, or attitude.

If you have a comment or suggestion, you can leave me a voice message on my voicemail line at 512-537-6356 or send me an email at paula@teachsuzuki.com.

For more information and articles, visit my blog at:

http://teachsuzuki.blogspot.com.

Until next time,

Happy Practicing!

—– Paula —–

© 2017 by Paula E. Bird

If you would like to make a donation to support the Teach Suzuki Podcast and the blog, click here to donate.